Tag Archives: monthly meeting

Show & Tell- Equipment

Well, it was that kind of session, with a lot of  ooohs! wows! what a good idea! not seen one of those before! how does that work? and so on…..

One of the first oohs! was the introduction of a Country Spinner- I don’t think many had seen one in real life and we were taken aback at the size of the bobbin and orifice

 

There were a variety of carders, hand carders- flat versus curved-

 

and very handy covers for them to protect the tines

 

Drum carders, Classic and Barnett

 

A variety of equipment, besides the carders, was  displayed to show how to blend fibres-

Blending boards- handmade at home and much, much cheaper than buying  readymade ones. Fibre is pressed into the board using a wallpaper paste brush. Small rolags made using large  and small knitting needles.

 

Homemade hackles with 6″ nails on one and metal Affro combs on the other and a selection of pottery and shell dizzes with a bead hook to help initially pull fibres through the diz.

 

 

There was a lovely warping board made by a member’s husband, who can turn his hand to anything

 

This a is a mudag, sometimes called a creelagh or murlagh. It is a basket once made in the Scottish Highlands but this was made by a Yorkshireman! It was used to hold fleece prior to spinning. The unusual shape meant fleece could be carded into rolags and placed by the fire  so the heat on the lanolin in the fleece would help with the spinning.

 

There were handy, handmade travelling, spinning machines- a rakestraw, and one made from a piece of wire

 

Here is  a Navajo spindle, the size of which brought a great big wow! It had to be about 4 foot in length, definitely not suitable to use whilst travelling!

 

Handmade Lazy Kates were in evidence

 

swifts, antique metal and wooden

 

Most of us have this type of ball winder

But just look at this beauty!

 

A lovely little weaving/darning tool and just look at the price!

 

I think this member’s husband should go into business with this Andean plying tool he made.

 

I’d never seen one of these before- a sailmaker’s palm

 

And here is a selection of items, not equipment, that members brought in to show us. Each one had a precious story behind it.

 

Thank you to all who brought in their treasures and made this such an interesting session.

 

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Small Loom Weaving

A pleasing turnout for this session. We also welcomed three new members (** see below re membership/workshops) to our small Guild which is very good.

There were a few different small looms being demonstrated on.

There was a short  demonstration of basic pin loom weaving. This is a very quick and simple way to do small patchwork pieces that can be sewn together to make larger pieces.

There is a basic pattern on the pin loom .

then there are other patterns such as a herrringbone

One of the good things is that as you weave, the bottom of the warp fills up as you weave the top bit. You can easily make a 6″ square in 15 minutes! It’s also something you can put down and pick up at any time without worrying where you’re up to!

You can find tutorials at the Fibre Factory website  ,Work for Idle Hands here and Donna Kallner website

For more complex patterns, Weave-it Weaves can be downloaded here.

Mary demonstrated weaving on the inkle loom. She told me that her husband had made this  in hardwood for someone who then decided they wanted it in softwood. Thereby Mary inherited this by default and had to go to the library to learn how to use it. I think she’s mastered it well!

Anne showed us how to weave on the Zoom Loom

Can’t remember the name of this modern version but we used to do it on a wooden cotton reel with four nails stuck in the top, sitting in front of an open fire, listening to the wireless…..oh, those were the days…….. and it was called French Knitting then!

Just a few of my more rustic ones

After a busy morning and lunch, some relaxed knitting and spinning whilst others carried on weaving.

If you decide you want to get your own pin loom, they are easy enough to make. If you do decide to buy one, be selective- some look very nice but are expensive, others are more basic/rustic but work just as well. If you want to join an online group, there are many. I joined this facebook  group and also got my loom from Julie Kernow who is Admin on that page. She has some for sale now.

Here are just a few things I found online that can be made from pin loom squares- there are many more inspirational items out there. Click on an image for a slideshow.

Just a few more photos from the day.Click on a picture for the slideshow

If anyone wants to look into small looms further, here is a link at aLoomaNation with downloadable manuals and patterns.

*Reminder that the 21 June session is ‘Show and Tell Equipment’. Please bring your unusual, or handmade, or exotic, or strange, or even weird equipment to show us!

**Unfortunately, we have to limit the Dyeing Picnic in July, and the Nuno felting in September, to existing members only.

 

 

Needle felting (careful…)

Our recent workshop was on needle felting, and specifically on 3D needle felting. Many of us have played with the pad and the rather dangerous – unless you’re careful – needles in the past, but not all of us have had a go at making needle-felted animals. This was our chance, and here’s a progression…

It’s going to be a head. Or maybe a body.

Definitely a body.

The first one was indeed a head, now attached and given a nose.

One penguin watching the birth of another penguin. As it were…

and here’s a duckling, and a whole array of other creatures:

and, of course, a toadstool.

Many, many thanks to our tutors, and to Sue who took the pictures!

And many thanks to all the people who have enjoyed our blog, contacted us through it, come along to our meetings because of it or said hello to us when they have spotted us spinning in public. Sadly, this will be the penultimate post (at least for a while – who knows, circumstances may change). The demands of work have made it very difficult for me to get to meetings and it’s not the same if you can’t join in. So in the next post I will round off the year with a look back at the six and half years of Llyn Guild blogs – and our online activity will move exclusively to our Facebook page.

A weaving workshop

As a Guild, many of us weave. We don’t necessarily bring looms to meetings, and we don’t always have weaving workshops – though there have been a few lately. Our most recent meeting was one, and this time looms were not needed. We were weaving bags on boxes.

The boxes had to be quite substantial because – as you can see – they had to withstand the pull on the warp….

Wine boxes – or in this case, a rum box – are ideal!

Then, once warped up, you can begin weaving.

There were quite a variety of approaches:

and everyone had a distinctive take.

There’s a lot to get done in one day, and hopefully some finished examples will be brought along to our next meeting, but here are some which were finished beforehand to demonstrate what can be achieved:

and how about this cutie?

(And apologies for the delay in posting, caused by a perfect storm: a combination of work, illness and computer problems, and huge thanks to Ramona for taking the photographs….)

Showing and telling

Our February meeting was a bit – well, plagued by the weather, and in a different venue to normal due to redecorating. But some intrepid members managed to battle their way through the storms and find the alternative location and bring some lovely things to show us. There was no unifying theme this year, just ‘bring something that has been completed recently, and that fits into our crafts’.

There was a piece of Saori weaving,

Sue's weaving

which the member concerned has just started doing. She’s done some more traditional weaving in the past, and thought she’d have a go at the more relaxed, informal Saori style. On balance, though, she thinks that she prefers the traditional approach.

This is part of a throw – one that you throw over your shoulders rather than over a chair.

throw

It’s a sampler, really, of various stitches and natural colours. The member who made it was also wearing a jumper in a similar style, but in indigo.

Next came two things from the same person, a knitted and felted bag and this beautiful fine lace shawl which was knitted in some fine Shetland wool bought in Lerwick, and dyed back at home:

shawl

In complete contrast was this cushion from another member,

Cushion

(apologies for the slighly fuzzy photo). It’s been made on a peg loom, in natural handspun fleece. You can do some really interesting things with peg looms; it’s worth experimenting.

And taking in yet another textile craft, there was this rag rug.

rag rug

It was made using the hooking technique, rather than prodding, and took about six old jumpers and T-shirts, plus some bits. The fabric for the border was dyed to match the central flower, and a blue T-shirt was overdyed with onion skins to get the green. It was worked freehand – not on a frame.

Apologies if your items didn’t make it onto this blog post – but what a range of textile crafts we covered, and huge respect to the members who braved the storm!

Spinning in the new year

As is traditional now, our first meeting after Christmas is a spinning and weaving session.

ready to go

Of course, it’s also a catch up with friends session too… It’s great to see everyone again after the break, and several of us were delighted to return to spinning after the break too (the more diligent ones had never stopped).

starting out

We had some new faces come along too, which is lovely. This is some first spinning from one of our new members,

starting

which – we all tried to convince her, because it’s true – is a really good start, and it is impressive. She’s not going to have any problems.

Here’s another bobbin, whirling around this time, with an interesting blend on it:

blend

Our externally tutored workshop for this year is on blending – details are on the events page – which should be really exciting. We’ll be using drum carders, like this one

carder

which one of our members had at the meeting. She was using it to prep some of the fleece from her own shetlands, but the workshop will feature all sorts of wonderments!

Do check out the events page. The meetings are on the sidebar, but there’s more detail on the page. And this year sees the All Wales Guild event in Llanidloes (October), plus we’ll be spinning in public at Greenwood Forest Park again in the summer. Possibly with dinosaurs again…

Workshops work

Our April meeting involved a show and tell, where members brought in some of the things they had either done in the workshops over the previous year, or which they had gone on to create after being in the workshops.

Many people had a go at weaving a beret (it was something a member had been seen doing at the dyeing picnic, and she was inundated with requests to demonstrate, resulting in a workshop). Here’s one, in pinks:

beret

The focus on weaving – a bit unusual for us, but it shouldn’t be – had continued with one of our regular ‘spin and weave’ sessions deliberately focusing on it instead of spinning (well, as well as spinning, of course – details in the previous post). There was lots of inspirational work, and among which was some purple saori-style weaving… well, here it is, off the loom and made into a jacket, incorporating felted panels as well:

wow

There was more weaving, too, of a more classic style:

IMG_4892

Let’s have a closer look:

IMG_4893 IMG_4894

as well as knitting:

IMG_4895 IMG_4898

and felting, reminding us that the next workshop is on felted landscapes. The felting workshops are always very popular, and there’s a list of what to bring along on the Events and Meetings page (click on the menu at the top). So here’s some inspiration:

gorgeous!

That’s 19 May, in case you were wondering how long you had to decide which landscape you were going to immortalise in wool!